Research & Publications Completed Research Studies
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Completed Research Studies

Singapore Children’s Society has completed research on the following subject matters:

Bullying

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Young Adults’ Recall of School Bullying (Completed in 2010)

This study looks at the possible long-term effects of bullying on victims after they leave school and enter the society. It is a retrospective study on young adults’ recollection of primary and secondary school bullying experiences.

Key findings from this study can be found in our research monograph, "Young Adults’ Recall of School Bullying".

Bullying in Singapore Schools (Completed in 2008)

This study gives an indication of the bullying problem in our schools. It highlights similarities and differences in bullying trends between students in primary and secondary schools in terms of the extent and nature of bullying among students, how they reacted to the bullying, and who they turned to for help on bullying. The study also looks at some characteristics of students who were bullied and those of their bullies, as well as characteristics of students who admitted to bullying others.

Key findings from this study can be found in our research monograph, "Bullying in Singapore Schools".

Separate summaries of key findings from the Primary and Secondary school surveys are available.

More resources on bullying are also available on our Bully-Free website.

Child Abuse and Neglect

Initial Studies on Perceptions of Child Abuse and Neglect in Singapore (Completed in 1994 and 1997)

In order to gain an understanding of how Singaporeans perceive child abuse and neglect, members of the public as well as various professionals were surveyed in 1994 and 1997 respectively. Several monographs were published between 1996 and 2003:

Replicated Studies on Perceptions of Child Abuse and Neglect in Singapore (Completed in 2010 and 2011)

To examine changes in perceptions of child abuse and neglect, this study replicated our earlier study on public and professional perceptions of child abuse and neglect conducted in the 1990s:   

Family/Child Development

Schools and the Class Divide: An Examination of Children's Self-concept and Aspirations in Singapore (Completed in 2016)

This study looks at the influence of school type on children's self-concept and aspirations, and their perceptions of other individuals in "elite" and "non-elite" schools. We also explored how school type may shape parents' aspirations for their children. 

Key findings from this study can be found in our research monograph, "Schools and the Class Divide: An Examination of Children's Self-concept and Aspirations in Singapore".

Children’s Social and Emotional Well-Being (Completed in 2008)

This study aimed to learn more about families and the state of social and emotional well-being of children in Singapore. Social well-being was investigated by finding out the quality of relationships between school children and their parents, grandparents, siblings and friends. Emotional well-being was examined by asking about children's mental health status. A particular focus was on the comparisons between the perceptions of the child and those of his or her parent.

Key findings from this study can be found in our research monograph, "Children's Social and Emotional Well-being in Singapore".

Parenting (Completed in 2006)

The Parenting Project is a research undertaken with an aim of understanding more about how parents in Singapore bring up their children, and how children view these practices. The research examined how children are disciplined by their parents when they misbehave, who the main caregivers are, and how parents interact with their children.

Key findings from this study can be found in our research monograph, "The Parenting Project: Disciplinary Practices, Child Care Arrangements and Parenting Practices".

Please contact our Research and Outreach Centre at 63580911 for more details.